Make Your Home CatSafe How To Keep Your Cat Happy and Healthy


"Make Your Home Cat-Safe - How To Keep Your Cat Happy and Healthy"



Lock things up that could cause harm

Keep the washer/dryer door closed at all times

Honk the car horn before starting it up

Use fire carefully

Keep all upstairs windows closed or screened

Store string away tidily

Keep floors free of small things

Be constantly aware of what your cat is doing Curiosity gets most cats in trouble at some point in their lives. As your cat's caregiver, keeping her safe sometimes seems like a "mission impossible." With a little foresight and action, however, you can create a "home, safe home."

When you're trying to provide the best home possible for your cat, it pays to think like her. Put on some old clothes and get down on hands and knees and take a look around. Is that shiny crystal vase on the shelf a tempting target? Remember that cats will jump onto shelves and tables.

That dangling drapery cord would be fun to leap and grab. What's in this big pot? In case you need help identifying what might catch a cat's eye, here's a list of common household items that are often the cause of cat injuries:

Roach and ant traps

electric and phone cords

cigarettes in ashtrays

open doors and windows

rubber bands

housecleaning chemicals

lit candles

Christmas trees

ornaments

paperclips

rocking chairs

uncovered toilets

trash cans

human medications

chocolate

anti-freeze

unattended boiling pots

electric stove burners

plastic bags.

Cats find plants irresistible as playthings. They love to pounce on them and shred them with both their claws and teeth. Although they are carnivores -meat eaters-they sometimes eat plant material. For these reasons, it's important to make sure the plants in and around your home won't pose a health risk. The following are some common house and landscape plants that are toxic to cats:

Philodendron English ivy

caladium dieffenbachia "elephant ear"

poinsettia

mistletoe

azaleas

holly

berries

boxwood

wisteria

hydrangea

oleander

chinaberry tree

If you live in an area prone to natural disasters, keep an emergency pet supply kit with your own. Include a week's worth of food as well as any medication your cat takes on a regular basis. A photo of your pet is also good to keep with your emergency supplies, in case you are separated from your cat during the event, you'll have a way to get the word out to locate her.

A collar with an identification tag is one of those things that you might never need, but will wish you had if you need it and don't. Even if your cat is strictly and indoor pet, the unexpected could happen. A door or window is left ajar, or a natural disaster creates an opening in your home through which your frightened feline escapes.

Your cat's identity tag should include the following information

Pet's name

Owner's name and address

Telephone numbers (day and evening)

Medical problem requiring medication

Veterinarian's name and number

Current Rabies vaccination information

Reward offer should pet become lost

Many people have their cats micro-chipped for identification. A small silicone chip containing the owner's contact information is painlessly inserted under the cat's skin. Most animal shelters automatically scan lost pets to read the owner contact information. However, if your cat is found by an average citizen an identification tag will speed up your reunion.

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